August 8, 2018










What is a Guardian Responsible For?

Most of the time, a guardian is someone who is appointed to take care of a minor child. In some instances, a guardian may also be responsible for taking care of an adult-aged person who is incapable of taking care of himself or herself. Additionally, the guardian is also responsible for handling the person’s assets. Sometimes, the guardian may be referred to as a conservator.

Most times, a guardian will be appointed to look after someone at the discretion of the court; however, in traditional circumstances, a guardian is someone who is the parent of a child. On the other hand, it is possible for the court to take away the rights of a parent if the parent is believed to be taking improper care of a child(ren). In addition, it is possible for someone to be appointed as the guardian of someone if the appointing was left in a will. A person can also choose for himself or herself, if of legal age, as to who his or her guardian will be in the event that he or she suffers from some type of severe disability.

The main responsibility that a guardian has over his or her ward(s) is that the latter is taken proper care of, including providing shelter, clothing and food. The guardian is there to ensure that the ward has access to education, health insurance and other types of benefits. If the ward has some type of property, banking account and/or assets, the guardian will manage those as well.

Sometimes, the guardian may or may not have access to the banking account of the ward. For example, if a child has a savings account set aside for him or her in the amount of $1,000,000, the guardian may be granted access to only 10 percent of the funds, leaving the remaining 90 percent to the child once he or she turns 18.

When a guardian is given the responsibility to take care of a minor child or one who suffers from no disability, the guardian’s responsibilities end when the child reaches 18 years of age. On the other hand, there are instances when a guardian is responsible for a ward for his or her entire life.

Sources:
http://wills.about.com/od/planningfordisability/tp/responsibilities.htm
http://www.courts.ca.gov/1211.htm